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Tracey Derrick Photographer South Africa

 

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Archival release of unique photographs

 

The photographer is releasing a limited collection of photographs from her personal archives, which span more than 20 years of work, from 1993 to 2004.

The photographs are full frame and untouched. Although they’re not editioned, they are one-offs, and all are signed and dated.

This is an exclusive opportunity to acquire work produced and printed by a highly respected photographer during a specific time frame in South African history. Some of the photographs have never been exhibited or published.

This collection of unique prints is being sold to cover medical expenses around the recurrence of Tracey’s breast cancer.

Sizes and Prices
8 x 10" (20,32 x 25,4cm) – R1000.00
6 x 8" (15,24 x 20,32cm) – R700.00
5 x 7" (12,7 x 17,78cm) – R500.00

Postage and handling
For domestic deliveries (within South Africa), please add R15 per order (up to 3 prints).
For international deliveries (elsewhere in the world), please add R45 per order (up to 3 prints).

Collection point in Cape Town
If you live in or near Cape Town, you can collect your order from Kirsty at the Association for Visual Arts Gallery at 35 Church Street.

Orders
Please contact Tracey with the prints you have selected at photos@traceyderrick.co.za or 082 256 0264 and she will respond with banking details and arrangements for delivery.

 

sold SOLD

click to enlarge

Project 1: Crowd, Grand Parade inaugeration 1994. Size 5x7 Project 1: Grand Parade Mandela speaking 1994. Sizes 5x7 Project 1: King George IV, inaugeration, Grand parade 1994. Size 5x7 Project 1: Mandela for president, Grand Parade 1994. Size 5x7 Project 2: Boys herding 1997. Size 6x8
Project 2: Brother of Headman Musengua 1995. Size 6x8 Project 2: Children help with all duties 1997. Size 6x8 Project 2: Daughter of Uhungora 1995. Size 6x8 Project 2: Headman Musengua Tjiposa 1997. Size 6x8 Project 2: Healer 1997. Size 6x8
Project 2: Seasonal importance of water  1995. Size 6x8 Project 2: Kukehariri rubs ochre 1995. Size 6x8 Project 2: Maintaining animal fences 1995. Size 6x8 Project 2: Mother of Headman Musengua 1995. Size 6x8 Project 2: Near wherever there is water 1997. Size 6x8
Project 2: Sunrise to sunset, all involved 1995. Size 6x8 Project 2: The Musengua clan 1997. Size 6x8 Project 2: The Ochre ritual 1997. Size 6x8 Project 2: The sacred fire 1997. Size 6x8 Project 2: Tin and leather 1997. Size 6x8
Project 2: Uhungora, wife of headman 1995. Size 6x8 Project 2: Water sunrise to sunset 1995. Size 6x8 Project 2: Western influence 1995. Size 6x8 Project 2: Whalundiri 's morning duties 1995. Size 6x8 Project 2: Whalundiri, 2nd wife of headman Tjiposa 1995. Size 6x8
Project 3: And food on the table 2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Bath time 2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Birhtday time, smuggled cake  2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Cell salon II 2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Cell time 2005. Size 6x8
Project 3: Fuck dem cops, contract killer 2005. Size 6x8 & 8x10 Project 3: Fuck you  2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Gambling 2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Hairdryer & TV, time  2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Accused of assisting rape of daughter 2005. Size 6x8
Project 3: If my heart can beat no more 2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Killing for protection 2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Line for lunch 2005. Size 8x10 Project 3: Local boy 2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Los jou 2005. Size 6x8
Project 3: Metal juice 2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: My child 2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Nail polish henna, leader 28's gang 2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Washing line 2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Sewing, occupied 2005. Size 6x8
Project 3: Shower  2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Shower, 28's gang  2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: The concert 2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: The keeper 2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Vark for lunch 2005. Size 6x8
Project 3: Wall paper, Wish you were here 2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: The Space  2005. Size 6x8 Project 3: Washing up 2005. Size 6x8 Project 4: Tess 2003. Size 6x8 Project 4: Gumboot dancers 1996. Size 6x8
Project 4: Jill Wenman 1993. Size 8x10 Project 4: Tess at Lombardie 2002. Size 6x8 Project 4: Lou with Morgan, on 'Cowslip' moored on River Lea, Hackeny Marshes 1991. Size 8x10 Project 4: Margaret Fourie, St. Georges Cathedral 1997. Size 6x8 Project 4: Mary Burton at home 1994. Size 6x8
Project 4: Visitor, Mtumfuf 1996. Size 6x8 Project 4: Tess, Annie, Kahli dam at home  2010. Size 5x7 Project 4: Ray Alexander, at home, 1994. Size 8x10 Project 4: Royal Hotel, Riebeek Kasteel, 1999. Size 6x8 Project 4: Sangoma mother, Mtumfuf 1996. Sizes 6x8 & 8x10
Project 4: Stan the Water Man, Riebeeks rivier 1999. Size 6x8 Project 4: Teo, Salvador, Brasil 1984. Size 8x10 Project 4: Tess & Amy at home 2003. Size 6x8 Project 5: After work,  at 'Body Heat' 1998. Size 6x8 Project 5: André at 'Knights' - men 2 men, 1998. Size 6x8
Project 5: Angel at 'Knights'  Men 2 Men 1998. Size 6x8 Project 5: Basha & Salvador, Milnerton beach, 1998. Size 6x8 Project 5: Basha in Woodstock 1997. Size 6x8 Project 5: Basha in Woodstock, 2, 1997. Size 6x8 Project 5: George cross dresser preparing for a night in Bothasig  1997. Size 6x8
Project 5: George, cross dresser, Bothasig 1997. Sizes 6x8 & 8x10 Project 5: Hester at work, Woodstock 1997. Size 6x8 Project 5: Jacusi at 'Body Heat'  massage parlour, Cape Town 1998. Sizes 5x7 + 6x8 + 8x10 Project 5: Mama Cas, Basha, Hester and Audrey, Woodstock 1998. Size 6x8 Project 5: Men 2 Men at 'Knights' 1998. Size 8x10
Project 5: Mira out for the night 1998. Sizes 6x8 + 8x10 Project 5: Basha at Miss Gay-Hollywood Look-a-like competition 1997. Sizes 5x7 + 8x10 Project 5: Peter beginning to prepare for 'Whores Ball' 1998. Size 6x8 Project 5: Peter preparing for 'Whore's Ball'  1998. Size 6x8 Project 5: Rachel, Salt River Main Road 1998. Size 5x7 + 6x8
Project 5: Transvestite group with Sal Milnerton beach 1998. Size 6x8 Project 5: Transvestite Woodstock 1997. Size 6x8 Project 5: Van Schoorsdrift, N7 highway with Sal 1998. Size 6x8 Project 5: Van Schoorsdrift, N7 highway, all weather,  1998. Size 8x10 Project 5: Van Schoorsdrift, N7 highway, waiting 1998. Size 6x8
Project 5: Vasili at the 'Whore's Ball' 1998. Size 6x8 Project 5: Vasili preparing for 'Whore's Ball' 1998. Size 6x8 Project 6: Lingulethu Malmesbury township 2004. Size 6x8 Project 6: Lingulethu Malmesbury township, 4,  2004. Size 6x8 Project 6: Nongakaninani Klaas, Khayelitsha 2004. Size 6x8
Project 6: Oom Paul Heyns, 2002. Size 6x8 Project 6: Piet, bike & sheep 2001. Size 6x8 Project 6: Priscilla, Ntombi and Linda. Size 6x8 Project 6: Riebeek West Tiger Martinus 2002. Size 6x8 Project 6: SA farmer , Goedgedacht 2002. Size 6x8
Project 6: Seasonal grape pickers, 2003. Size 6x8 Project 6: Sheared sheep 2004. Size 6x8 Project 6: Sheep shearing, 2, 2004. Size 6x8 Project 6: Winnie Fischer & house 2004. Size 6x8 Project 7: A Day in the Life of SA, 1994. Size 6x8
Project 7: Bakoven 1993. Size 6x8 Project 7: Boshoff Riebeeksrivier, 2001. Size 6x8 Project 7: Breede River 1993. Size 5x7 Project 7: De Waal Park, CT, 1993. Size 6x8 Project 7: Epembe Namibia 1995. Size 6x8
Project 7: Kommetjie 1994. Size 6x8 Project 7: Milnerton Beach 1994. Size 6x8 Project 7: Milnerton Beach 1997. Size 6x8 Project 7: Mtmfuf, Transkei 1996. Size 6x8 Project 7: Mtmfuf, Transkei, 1996. Size 6x8
Project 7: Namibia 1995. Size 6x8 Project 7: Noordhoek 1994. Size 6x8 Project 7: North of Opuwo, Namibia 1995. Size 6x8 Project 7: Observatory 1994. Size 6x8 Project 7: Ruacana, Namibia, 1997. Size 6x8
Project 7: Sea Point promenade 1994. Size 8x10 Project 8:  Father and son, 1996. Size 6x8 Project 8:  I provide a safe house for refugees 1996. Size 6x8 Project 8:  The Ark, 1996. Size 6x8 Project 9:  Baobab tree , Namibia 1995. Size 6x8 + 8x10
Project 9:  Camps Bay from Lions Head 1993. Size 6x8 Project 9:  Camps Bay sunset 1994. Size 6x8 Project 9:  Du Toits Kloof tunnel 1995. Size 5x7 Project 9:  Franskraal 1994. Size 8x10 Project 9:  Leaving for Robben Island 1997. Size 6x8
Project 9:  Lions Head 1992. Size 8x10 Project 9:  Llundudno 1993. Size 8x10 Project 9:  Lombardie, Riebeeksrivier, 2002. Size 6x8 Project 9:  Lone tree Namibia 1997. Size 6x8 Project 9:  Mocambique 1994. Size 8x10
Project 9:  Mozambique, Nampula 1994. Size 8x10 Project 9:  Mtumfuf, Transkei 1996. Size 5x7 Project 9:  River bed tree Namibia 1997. Size 6x8 Project 9:  Robben Island boat 1997. Size 8x10 Project 9:  Skeleton tree Namibia 1997. Size 6x8
Project 9:  Windmill Riebeeksrivier 2002. Size 6x8 Project 10: Zambezi river to Sena, fear of crocodiles 1994. Size 8x10 Project 10: Boarding at Nsanje in Malawi, estimated one and half million Mocambicans fled because of the war. Size 8x10 Project 10: Children in Beira 1994. Size 8x10 Project 10: Domino Belo & family returning to promised peace 1994. Size 8x10
Project 10: Election rally Maputo 1994. Size 8x10 Project 10: Family in Tete 1994. Size 8x10 Project 10: Frelimo rally 1994. Size 8x10 Project 10: Josina Machel, goat slaughtered in my honour 1994. Size 6x8 Project 10: Landmine clearing camp 1994. Size 5x7
Project 10: Mutarara airport, bubonic plague 1994. Size 6x8 Project 10: Nampula regions reached by South African helicopters, collecting voting kits 1994. Size 8x10 Project 10: Nampula, Mocambique 1994. Size 8x10 Project 10: Order, returning home to vote 1994. Size 8x10 Project 10: Post war, Mocambique 1994. Size 8x10
Project 10: Refugee transit camp, Baue, at Mutarara Sede 1994. Size 8x10 Project 10: Refugee transit, Baue, Mutarara 1994. Size 8x10 Project 10: Refugees in Nasanje, Malawi 1994. Size 8x10 Project 10: Refugees reclaiming ancestral lands 1994. Size 8x10 Project 10: Tete airport for Frelimo, Brazilian design election campaign 1994. Size 8x10
Project 10: Returning from Malawi to vote at home 1994. Size 8x10 Project 10: Villa Nova 1994. Size 8x10 Project 10: Waiting to vote Maputo 1994. Size 8x10 Project 11: A moment before, 1993. Size 8x10 Project 11: Baptism improves health and increases reception of powerful spiritual energy  1994. Size 8x10
Project 11: The Waters of Life: Bare feet on the ground protects from danger and evil spirits 1994. Size 6x8. Project 11: Evil away, 1994. Sizes 5x7 + 6x8 + 8x10 Project 11: Furniture is cleared away and a lounge becomes a church, drums and singing radiate from houses and yards, 1994. Size 8x10 Project 11: I could feel energy all around me. 1994. Size 6x8 Project 11: New energy and hope after the sea has washed away darkness and destruction, 1994. Size 8x10
Project 11: New energy, 1994. Sizes 6x8 + 8x10 Project 11: New meaning to life, Monwabisi beach,  1994. Size 8x10 Project 11: Nono preparing in Khayelitsha 1994. Size 8x10 Project 11: Nono, Sal and priest, Monwabisi beach, 1993. Size 6x8 Project 11: Reception of spiritual energy, 1994. Sizes 5x7
Project 11: Salt cleanses, 1994. Size 8x10 Project 11: The circle and harmony, 1993. Sizes 5x7 + 8x10 Project 11: The crashing sea mixes with the sound of the drums to help fight demons. 1994. Size 8x10 Project 11: The service starts at sunset and members arrive at the beach by sunrise. 1994. Sizes 6x8 + 8x10 Project 11: The toils of daily life forgotten. 1994. Sizes 5x7 + 8x10

Project 1 ‘Inauguration’, Cape Town, 9 May 1994

‘Today we are entering a new era for our country and its people. Today we celebrate not the victory of a party, but a victory for all the people of South Africa.’
This was how South Africa’s first democratically elected President, Nelson Mandela, opened his address to the people of Cape Town, delivered on the Grand Parade, on the occasion of his inauguration. Tracey Derrick was there.

 

Project 2 ‘The Red Ochre People’, Kaokoveld, 1995

When Tracey heard that the Namibian government intended to dam the Cunene River, a project that would threaten the local ecosystem and impact severely on the wellbeing of the semi-nomadic Himba of the region, she travelled there to document a lifestyle that looked in danger of disappearing forever. Today, thanks largely to the fierce protests of the Himba chiefs; the dam still hasn’t gone beyond the planning stages.
Photographs from this collection have been exhibited in New York and various South African cities.

 

Project 3 ‘Eye Inside’, Malmesbury, 2007

Tracey spent over a year documenting the inmates at the Malmesbury Women’s prison. Photographs from this collection were exhibited in Johannesburg and Cape Town.
‘Most of the women I met are there because they needed to put bread on the table for their families or they’re caught up in the traditional patriarchal system of power and gangs that comes from our long history of exploitation,’ says Tracey.
• Tracey later ran an eight-week photography course in the prison, teaching the women basic camera skills.

 

Project 4 Portraits, various locations, 1993-2010

 

Project 5 ‘Basic Necessity’, Cape Town, 1997

Tracey’s honest and empathetic portrayals of the people in this ‘scorned, marginalised and persecuted’ industry have been exhibited locally at the Grahamstown Festival and in Cape Town, and internationally in Paris, France and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
‘Everybody sells themselves in some way,’ says Tracey. ‘These people are courageous; they laugh at themselves, laugh at the society they live in. They are wicked and I love that.’

 

Project 6 ‘EarthWorks’, the Swartland, 2004

‘Ten years into the new democracy, it seems that those who work to feed us in South Africa have yet to reap any benefits from the new dispensation,’ said Tracey of her work documenting the lives of farm labourers in the Western Cape agricultural belt known as the Swartland.
Despite the new post-apartheid regime, many practices of abuse and exploitation still persist on the farms, Tracey observes, and the community must wrestle with other problems too: land tenure, poor housing, low wages, racism and change.
Photographs from this collection have been exhibited locally in Cape Town and Riebeek Kasteel, and internationally in Germany, the UK, France and Japan. They have also appeared in various publications.

 

Project 7 ‘Her and me’, various locations, 1990-2005

‘Sometimes I wonder if she was my shadow or I was hers,’ says Tracey about Salvador, the crossbreed street dog who became her constant companion for 15 years. ‘We criss-crossed Southern Africa together, slept, ate, walked, ran and played together, on mountains, beaches and deserts, through rivers, in seas and rain, in cities, on farms and in rural villages. Sal taught me love, bravery, integrity, fun, loyalty, the ever-present moment of now.’
Photographs from this collection have been exhibited in Cape Town and Riebeek Kasteel.

 

Project 8 ‘Hope from Home’, Cape Town, 1997

In 1994, Tracey travelled to warn-torn areas in Mozambique and Malawi to witness the return of refugees to their homes. ‘It was an emotional experience to be with people who were finally returning to where they belonged,’ she says. ‘They returned with little, but were filled with hope for a new future.’
Back in Cape Town, Tracey documented the lives of refugees from all over Africa. ‘The refugees I met were like us - they had similar needs, and their priorities in life are universal, like wanting to live securely in a comfortable home.’
Photographs from this collection went on solo exhibition at the Castle of Good Hope, Cape Town.

 

Project 9 Landscapes, various locations, 1993-2004

 

Project 10 ‘Still Moving’, Mozambique, 1994

Mozambique’s first democratic elections in 1994 bought hope of stability to a people who had been dispersed by decades of war. ‘My general impression was one of a people in transit – a nomadism of people searching,’ says Tracey of her two months documenting life in that country. Her photographs, which have been exhibited in Cape Town, show people rebuilding their lives: ‘People retained their sense of humour, mutual support and strong family bonds,’ she recalls. ‘They found the energy to continue among flimsy political promises and trust that the end of gunfire is a reason for optimism that can only carry them forward.’

 

Project 11 ‘The Waters of Life’, South African townships, 1995-1997

Some 35% of the black population of South Africa belongs to the Independent African Churches, which utilise a combination of Christianity, traditional culture and ancestoral worship. Tracey’s photographs of this, then largely unexplored, area of documentation have been exhibited locally in Cape Town, Durban, Johannesburg and Pretoria, and internationally in Paris, Berlin, Stuttgart and Brussels. In them, she has captured the unique energy and vibrancy of African spirituality during many 24-hour ceremonies.